Amazon Parrot – Brazil

Amazon Parrot – Brazil

Reintroduction project of Amazona vinacea in Brazil

Vinaceous Amazons(Amazona vinacea) is classified as vulnerable in Brazil by the IUCN. This specie was reported to be currently extinct in the National Park where the release project was taken.

I would advise people working with small sized amazons to use this collar version as they were simple to install and birds didn’t manage to damage it. The ratio between price and quality was very good and they are proving to be my first choice when another release is taking place.

 

André Saidenberg

DVM, MS, PhD candidate

Epidemiology Department – Sao Paulo University – Brazil

World Parrot Trust Representative – www.parrots.org

A group of 15 Vinaceous Amazons (Amazona vinacea) confiscated from the illegal pet trade were being held in a rescue center in the Santa Catarina State in Brazil.

After carefully choosing the appropriate collar model following the advices of Telenax staff I decided to use the TXE-120CP which weighing only 8 grams was perfect in size and weight for this project with an estimate range of 25Km and 7 months battery life it was what we needed to do the job.

We previously adapted each candidate (4 in total) to receive the collar with dummy collars made of wire and an empty bullet shell. There was a real concern that they would try to remove the collars and even mutilating themselves or the companions or that it could get stuck in the wire mesh. They adapted mostly immediately and careful trimming and bending of the wires used on the dummy version proved to be safe. The adaptation period with the dummy collar was also useful for the birds to get used to a (even though small) additional weight so they could adapt easily their flight skills wearing this device.

Although we wanted to do this one or two days earlier, actual collars were attached to the birds just after arriving to the release, after removing the dummy versions. Birds didn’t bother that much with the new apparel since the real collar was much more comfortable and weighed less. Some preening over the antenna and battery was performed but without causing damage to the unit. The plastic cover over the neck was chewed on and in fact provided a good distraction but the parrots didn’t work their way through the antenna wire.

One of the concerns was that attaching collars could somewhat disturb their behavior including affecting the bond between pairs. This wasn’t observed at all and the fact that the battery was enclosed in a black epoxy may have been an additional help since a bright color or silver from the metal case hypothetically could either be distressing to the parrots as well as affecting their camouflage pattern against predators.

So far 8 birds are visiting the feeders with supplemental (wild food types) food and seem to be adapting pretty well to their second chance of freedom.

The collars have been tracked up to 5Km in distance since the tracked birds haven’t dispersed far from the release area so far.

I would advise people working with small sized amazons to use this collar version as they were simple to install and birds didn’t manage to damage it. The ratio between price and quality was very good and they are proving to be my first choice when another release is taking place.

Article submitted by André Saidenberg, Ph.D.

Telenax wishes to thank André Saidenberg and Sao Paulo University for sharing this article.

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